Geometric Algebra : Conformal Geometry

Non-Euclidean Geometries

 NonEuclidean

The peculiar warp observed in the Bubble World perspective and its inversive counterpart in the conformal sphere is reminiscent of non-Euclidean geometry. Three mathematicians, Karl Friedrich GaussNicolai Lobaschefsky, and Janos Bolyai, each independently wondered while studying Euclid’s “Elements” why Euclid had not bothered to prove his “Fifth Postulate” with the same rigor as he had with the rest of his postulates. Essentially the “Fifth Postulate” states that if two lines that cross a third line form internal angles that sum to less than 180 degrees, then those lines must cross somewhere.

ParallelPostulate

This is equivalent to the “Parallel Postulate” that parallel lines never meet, and it is also equivalent to the rule that the internal angles of a triangle sum to 180 degrees. Each of those three mathematicians set out to prove the Fifth Postulate, and all three of them failed, because although the postulate seems self-evident, it is in fact impossible to prove.

InversionBubble35

That in turn opened the possibility for non-Euclidean geometries, i.e. that it is possible to define a whole non-linear equivalent to Euclidean geometry that works in a space with positive curvature like the Bubble World perspective.

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The Herouni Antenna – Death of the Big Bang

Pierre-Marie Robitaille, Ph.D., is a professor of radiology at The Ohio State University. He also holds an appointment in the Chemical Physics Program. In 1998, he led the design and assembly of the world’s first Ultra High Field MRI System. This brought on the need to question fundamental aspects of thermal physics, including ideas related to Kirchhoff’s Law of thermal emission, and more.

Professor Arevik Sargsyan
Assoc. Professor of NPUA,
President of AE&LLL Association,
Director of ARLIAN LLC.

Key paper relative to the self noise at 8mm:
P. Herouni, Measured Parameters of Large Antenna of ROT-54/2.6 Tell about Absence of Big Bang
Journal of Astrophysics: Reports. — National Academy of Sciences of Armenia 2007, v. 107, no. 1. 73-78.

Measured Parameters of Large Antenna of ROT-54/2.6 Tell about Absence of Big Bang

P. Herouni, About Self Noises of Radio-Optical Telescope ROT-54/2.6 Antenna. Journal of Applied Electromagnetism. Athens. 1999, v. 2, No. 1, 51-57.

The aforementioned paper by Professor Herouni has just been reinstated as item 7 (the last) in JAE V.2., N.2 (not the original V.2., N.1) 1999.

 

4 Anomalies in The Big Bang Afterglow:

 

As the theory goes; some 14 billion years ago, there was “nothing” focalized in a single, highly-dense point. Then, that “nothing” exploded, hurling the ingredients for everything we see in the universe into existence. On paper, it sounds insane. Heck, its kind of IS insane, but we have several pieces of solid (but not irrefutable) evidence that show not only could it have happened this way, but that it probably did.

One such proof comes in the form of the “Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation,” (CMB or CMBR) the after-glow of the big bang, if you will. It gives us an opportunity to understand the very first moments following the creation of the universe, yet it also poses many tantalizing mysteries that threaten to unhinge the very fabric on which we believe the universe was formed.

Before we go into those, let’s first explore what the CMBR is. Amazingly, this story has a crappy start.

In 1965, before two scientists, Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, started measuring radio signals as they bounced from balloon satellites for NASA’s “Project Echo,” they needed to take preventive measures to make sure the data they collected was completely incorruptible.

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Eugene Bagashov & Jim Weninger Oumuamua Data Reveals Intriguing Possibilities – Reference

 

SolStation

Astronomers have known since the 1970s that the Solar Neighborhood lies in the middle of an enormous “Local Bubble” of million-degree, ionized hydrogen gas, surrounded by a wall of colder, denser neutral gas.

Astronomers have known since the 1970s that the Solar Neighborhood lies in the middle of an enormous “Local Bubble” of million-degree, ionized hydrogen gas, surrounded by a wall of colder, denser neutral gas.

Within this hot bubble, gas density is much sparser, with some 100 to 1,000 times fewer hydrogen atoms, than the average density of the rest of the Milky Way’s spiral disk. The Local Bubble was thought, at first, to be an asymmetric cavity of 330 to 490 light-years (ly) — 100 to 150 parsecs (pc) — in diameter.

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