4 Anomalies in The Big Bang Afterglow:

 

As the theory goes; some 14 billion years ago, there was “nothing” focalized in a single, highly-dense point. Then, that “nothing” exploded, hurling the ingredients for everything we see in the universe into existence. On paper, it sounds insane. Heck, its kind of IS insane, but we have several pieces of solid (but not irrefutable) evidence that show not only could it have happened this way, but that it probably did.

One such proof comes in the form of the “Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation,” (CMB or CMBR) the after-glow of the big bang, if you will. It gives us an opportunity to understand the very first moments following the creation of the universe, yet it also poses many tantalizing mysteries that threaten to unhinge the very fabric on which we believe the universe was formed.

Before we go into those, let’s first explore what the CMBR is. Amazingly, this story has a crappy start.

In 1965, before two scientists, Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, started measuring radio signals as they bounced from balloon satellites for NASA’s “Project Echo,” they needed to take preventive measures to make sure the data they collected was completely incorruptible.

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Eugene Bagashov & Jim Weninger Oumuamua Data Reveals Intriguing Possibilities – Reference

SolStation

Astronomers have known since the 1970s that the Solar Neighborhood lies in the middle of an enormous “Local Bubble” of million-degree, ionized hydrogen gas, surrounded by a wall of colder, denser neutral gas.

Astronomers have known since the 1970s that the Solar Neighborhood lies in the middle of an enormous “Local Bubble” of million-degree, ionized hydrogen gas, surrounded by a wall of colder, denser neutral gas.

Within this hot bubble, gas density is much sparser, with some 100 to 1,000 times fewer hydrogen atoms, than the average density of the rest of the Milky Way’s spiral disk. The Local Bubble was thought, at first, to be an asymmetric cavity of 330 to 490 light-years (ly) — 100 to 150 parsecs (pc) — in diameter.

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062 EU Meetup December 18th 2018

Gravity Exploration

Ignacio Cisneros – Images from EU Skype Group

Empirical Theory

A further and related blow to the statement centered
empiricist account of meaning arose from
studies in the history of science. Empiricists held
science to be the paradigm of rational inquiry. On
this model, both individual beliefs (e.g., scientific
hypotheses) and whole theories were accepted or
rejected by comparing statements implied by a
theory against what experience reveals. However,
the history of science manifests a rather different
picture of this relationship between experience and
belief. Indeed, the historical picture reverses the
order of knowing assumed by empiricism. Belief
determines what in perception is correct and not
vice versa. As a consequence of the interdependence
of statements discussed above, theories
shaped the very perception of what might count as
evidence. One could not observe microbes by looking
through a microscope if one had no way of
integrating what one observes into a more informed
understanding of these observations as those things.
Nothing in the mere act of looking determines
foreground and background, items of significance
from mere “noise.”

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