Richard Moore – Climate Variation & its Cosmic Origins

Richard K. Moore
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cyberjournal.org

Abstract: The emerging electric model of the universe holds the key to understanding the causes of long and short-term climate variation. The pattern of variation has very specific characteristics, characteristics that match the behavior of a noisy electrical circuit. The electric model reveals that the Earth is indeed connected to a cosmic electrical circuit, a circuit that is subject to the kind of noise that could produce the patterns seen in the Earth’s temperature record.

Earth’s fractal temperature pattern

The past 420,000 years – the ice-age cycle

The most reliable long-term temperature record we have comes from ice core data. The charts presented here are based on data downloaded from the World Center for Paleoclimatology, Boulder. The Antarctic dataset comes from Vostok, and goes back 420,000 years. The Arctic dataset comes from Greenland, and goes back 50,000 years. Both datasets are useful up until about 1880 AD. Vostok temperatures are shown in red; Greenland temperatures are shown in green.

The temperatures shown for each dataset are expressed in degrees centigrade, relative to the dataset’s temperature in 1800 AD, which is shown as zero. The years are expressed as a calendar date, negative indicating BC. Only values up to 1800 AD are shown in these charts, so that we’ll be looking at natural climate variation, prior to any effects that might arise from industrial-era greenhouse gas emissions.

In this long-term record we see a fractal pattern – the same kind of pattern occurring on different scales. On the largest scale, we a sequence of first-tier temperature spikes of about 10° C, occurring with an irregular frequency of about 100,000 years. In between these spikes are ice ages, and the tops of the spikes give us our brief inter-glacial periods of about 10,000 years. On a smaller scale we see a similar pattern of second-tier spikes in the range of 2°–5°, occurring with a semi-regular frequency of about 10,000 years. As we’ll see in later charts, this fractal pattern, of semi-regular spikes, continues on ever-smaller timescales.

4 Anomalies in The Big Bang Afterglow:

 

As the theory goes; some 14 billion years ago, there was “nothing” focalized in a single, highly-dense point. Then, that “nothing” exploded, hurling the ingredients for everything we see in the universe into existence. On paper, it sounds insane. Heck, its kind of IS insane, but we have several pieces of solid (but not irrefutable) evidence that show not only could it have happened this way, but that it probably did.

One such proof comes in the form of the “Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation,” (CMB or CMBR) the after-glow of the big bang, if you will. It gives us an opportunity to understand the very first moments following the creation of the universe, yet it also poses many tantalizing mysteries that threaten to unhinge the very fabric on which we believe the universe was formed.

Before we go into those, let’s first explore what the CMBR is. Amazingly, this story has a crappy start.

In 1965, before two scientists, Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, started measuring radio signals as they bounced from balloon satellites for NASA’s “Project Echo,” they needed to take preventive measures to make sure the data they collected was completely incorruptible.

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